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Post  Guest on 2013-02-12, 2:09 pm

Watching the scousers, and Gerrard, the thinking about Lampard etc..

Name a proper attacking c/m that has played for SAFC....

Maybe one for those with longer memories..
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Post  Vincemac on 2013-02-12, 4:14 pm

commachio wrote:Watching the scousers, and Gerrard, the thinking about Lampard etc..

Name a proper attacking c/m that has played for SAFC....

Maybe one for those with longer memories..
mmmmm has there been any sice Swartz
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Post  Guest on 2013-02-12, 4:58 pm

Tony Towers signed by Stokoe after the Cup Final.
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Post  gil t azell on 2013-02-12, 5:17 pm

Don Hutchison. was he not c/m?
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Post  Silvers on 2013-02-12, 6:29 pm

Johnny Crossan

George Herd
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Post  Silvers on 2013-02-12, 6:31 pm

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Hall of Fame - George Herd




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George Herd was born in 1936, and was stationed up in Inverness
during his National Service, as a PT Instructor. During this time his
football prowess brought him to the attention of Inverness Thistle.
When he came back to Glasgow, he signed for Queens Park on the 1st of
August 1956 and stayed a season at Hampden, playing 31 games and
scoring 6 goals. Although we weren’t in the same division, in season
1956/57 we still met The Spiders on six occasions, via the League Cup,
the Glasgow Cup and the Scottish Cup. George played in the Glasgow Cup
and Scottish Cup games against us, but didn’t manage to score or come
out on a winning side.

He clearly, though, did enough to impress Clyde scouts, and on
the 4th of May 1957 he duly signed professional forms and moved his kit
across to Shawfield. George might well be able to lay claim to the
shortest time between signing and making his debut – Clyde were playing
Rangers in the Glasgow Charity Cup semi-final at Ibrox that night, so
George duly found himself listed as outside-right. It wasn’t a good
result, though, as we went down 0-2 to Rangers.

George retained his place in the team at the start of 1957/58,
and only missed four matches out of the forty nine we played that
season. Our newly-promoted team finished an extremely creditable fourth
in the league that season. Included in George’s total appearances are
nine matches in League Cup, where we lost the semi-final 2-4 after
coming back from 2 goals down to draw level. And there are of course
the six matches in the Scottish Cup, but more on that later.

George’s form earned him Scotland Under-23 recognition. In his
debut for the young Scots, where he played alongside Clyde team mate
Dan Currie, the young Scots beat the Dutch at Hampden by
4-1. Dan Currie scored Scotland’s first goal, George scored the
second.

Then, at the climax of season 1957/58, came Amazing April and Magnificent May for George.



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On the 19th of April, George made his full international debut,
against England at Hampden. It couldn’t get much bigger; the only
unfortunate matter was that Scotland lost 0-4. NB With George in the
Scottish team that day was Harry Haddock, playing his last full
international.

Exactly a week later, on the 25th of April 1958, George was back
on the Hampden turf, this time with Clyde. The occasion was the
Scottish Cup Final, the opponents were Hibs, and the outcome was
settled when a Johnny Coyle shot turned out to be the only goal of the
game.

On the 30th of April George travelled to Holland for the return
match with the Dutch. The result wasn’t good, a 1-2 defeat for the
young Scots, but George had picked up his second Under-23 cap to
further his international aspirations.

On the 12th of May George was back at the venue that was rapidly
becoming his second home, Hampden. Rangers provided the opposition in
the Glasgow Charity Cup final, but George scored Clyde’s third as the
opposition proved no match for a rampant Bully Wee in a 4-0 mauling.

So that was April and May 1958 for George Herd. A Scottish Cup
Winners medal, A full international cap, and against the English for
good measure, a second under-23 cap, and a Glasgow Charity Cup Winners
medal. Not a bad haul in his first season as a professional!

As with season 57/58, the following season saw George only miss 4
matches all season. Whilst the peaks of the previous season weren’t
quite scaled as we turned fourth-top into fourth-bottom, we still
managed a trophy. Rangers again provided the opposition in the Glasgow
Cup final at Hampden, but the game finished in a goalless draw. In the
replay at Ibrox Clyde beat their Glasgow rivals by a single Johnny
Coyle goal, so George had another medal to put on his mantelpiece.

In 1960, George not only garnered another four full international
caps, he also represented the Scottish League on three occasions. His
full international caps came about as follows; he played against
Hungary in Budapest, in a 3-3 draw, in which he scored Scotland’s
second goal; he played against Turkey in Ankara, in a 2-4 defeat; then
in the Home International Championships he played against Wales in
Cardiff (0-2 defeat) and Northern Ireland (at Hampden) in a 5-2
victory. The game against Northern Ireland was played in November 1960,
and come the next international against England in April 1961 it was a
Scottish team that showed seven changes that took the field at Wembley.
It’s probably not too high on George’s list of disappointments, as
Scotland crashed to the record defeat of the entire Scotland v England
series, England winning 9-3.



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George is presented with his Hall of
Famemomento by Jim Duffy in 2011

His three Scottish League appearances were as follows; first he
played at Highbury against the English League, which ended in a 0-1
defeat for the Scottish League in late March 1960; then, in September
1960 he played in a 2-1 win over the Irish League at Windsor Park;
finally, on the 5th of October, George played against the League of
Ireland at Celtic Park, and scored a fine hattrick with two shots and a
header as the Scottish League won 5-1.

In May 1961 George’s time with Clyde came to an end when
Sunderland paid a reported £42500 to take him to Roker Park. The
equivalent figure for George’s transfer today is a fantastic £770,000!
No wonder it was Sunderland’s record signing at the time.

George had played 171 matches for the Bully Wee, and scored 32 goals.

George became a fixture in the Sunderland team, although he never
got another international cap. He did though, play alongside Harry
Hood when Harry trod the same path as George some years later. Over the
nine years after he left Clyde, George would go on to play over 300
games for the Black Cats, and score 55 goals, which is around the same
goalscoring average as he had when he was with Clyde. He also holds the
distinction of being the first substitute to score for Sunderland.

George finished his playing career with a short spell at
Hartlepool, before going into coaching at both Sunderland and Newcastle
United. He also had a spell at management with Queen of the South (as
did Harry Hood, his erstwhile Sunderland colleague and now
fellow-Inductee in Clyde’s Hall of Fame) before going back to coaching
with Darlington.
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Post  Silvers on 2013-02-12, 6:36 pm

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To Sunderland supporters of a certain vintage, Johnny Crossan – who scored 39 times for us in 82 games between 1962 and 1965 – is something of a legend.

“Before him, all my heroes were those of my dad,” one fan, Keith
Scott, was telling Pete Sixsmith at a recent (Reserves) match. “Johnny
Crossan was the first who was my own.”

Salut! Sunderland‘s mission to obtain an interview
with the former Northern Ireland inside forward, 46 years after he last
kicked a ball at Roker Park, is a legacy of another long-in-the-tooth
SAFC follower’s trip to Johnny’s home town, Stroke City (as in
Derry-stroke-Londonderry, according to where you fit in the
nationalist/loyalust divide).

Pete Horan had been sent to work with people at the local tax office.
In his luggage on departure was a book on Crossan that Pete Sixsmith
asked him to take to his sports shop and have autographed. Raising the
question at work, Pete was told: “You’re in luck: come along for a spot
of five-a-side tonight and you’ll meet him.”



Meet him? Pete H also got to play with him. Even today, at 72, Johnny
turns out two or three times a week. And when we ran a recent piece
about the signing of James McLean from Derry City, Johnny’s old club, a
supporter of that team sent a message with the phone number for our
former player’s shop. The wheels were in motion.

Johnny instantly agreed to talk to Salut! Sunderland, a reflection of the great happiness he found playing and living in the North East.

This is the result of our conversation, which began from France,
continued from Sixsmith Towers in Shildon and concluded with a marathon
call from a certain County Durham hotel that would have bankrupted M
Salut twice over had the manager not waived the charge, not because he
supported SAFC but to compensate for internet access problems during a
stay there.

The headline? I wanted to know whether Johnny’s heart lay in
Manchester or Sunderland and was delighted with the response (which I
hope would have been the same had a City supporter posed the same
question).

The interview will stretch to two, possibly three parts, and starts here …

Salut! Sunderland: Can you remember seeing Sunderland and the North East for the first time, and what you made of it?

<blockquote>The first time I came was when Len Shackleton had
arranged a testimonial for Frank Brennan at Roker Park. I didn’t see too
much of Sunderland that time, but remember staying at the Roker Hotel
and thinking with the seafront and promenade that it was a little like
home. I did find people very hospitable and easy to get on with. They
were extremely friendly and I was only there for a testimonial!

Shack had got together Bobby Mitchell, Jackie Milburn, Stan Anderson
for the game which had to be played at Roker Park because Stan Seymour
(then chairman of Newcastle United) wouldn’t let him hold it at St
James’ Park; Frank had opened a sports shop in Newcastle, where of
course Seymour had a similar business of his own, and that had gone down
like a bomb with him.

When I came back as a player to join Sunderland, I found the whole
thing unbelievable. These were absolutely fanatical football people,
much more knowledgeable about the game that in other places.

</blockquote>

What is the true story of how you ended up excluded from the game in Britain, and how was it resolved?

<blockquote>I played for Derry City and then moved to Coleraine. The
great Northern Ireland footballer Pete Doherty wanted to take me to
Bristol City, where he was the manager. They were saying I was the
“second Pete Doherty” but I was only there a week. A certain Hardaker (Alan, secretary of the Football League
– ed) put his boot in it to make sure I was not allowed to play in the
UK. Back in Ireland, a disciplinary commission suspended me sine die from football for being paid at Derry City while an amateur. It was all of 30 bob a week.*

So I went to play for Sparta Rotterdam (who have played in red and white stripes since club officials visited Sunderland in 1899 and were impressed by what they saw
– ed) and we reached the quarter finals of the European Cup, going out
to Rangers after three games – we beat them at Ibrox, they beat us in
Holland and then they won the replay at Highbury 3-2. And we finished
runners-up in the league.

I was about to get married and told the club I’d need an apartment
and was promised this would be arranged. But at the end of the season
when I asked again about it, nothing was forthcoming and I moved to
Standard Liege, where I was extremely fortunate and played very well for
three seasons, I will never forget March 1962 when we played the great
Real Madrid in the European Cup semi-final – against the team of Alfredo
Di Stéfano, Puskas and Gento. I got to know Puskas very well. It was
fantastic to have met him in competition and then to have time with him
afterwards.

That year, 1962, at the World Cup (in Chile), the Sunderland chairman, Syd Collings (a big shot at the FA) had a word with Harry Cavan (then president of the Irish Football Association, later senior vice-president of Fifa
– ed). He asked when the ban on me was going to be lifted so I could be
signed for Sunderland. The conversation led on and led on and Harry
said ‘come and play a game against Lisburn at Windsor Park’. It was
agreed and Sunderland did play there once I’d been signed.

</blockquote>
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.].. at this linkVisit the Salut! Sunderland Shop ...

You picked up some French while living in Belgium and playing
for Standard Liege? Did you come fluent and how well have you kept it?

<blockquote>I did become fluent, and in Dutch as well. I’d done a bit
of Latin at school which helped with the French but Dutch was
completely different. I have kept in touch with people, especially in
Montpellier which send youngsters to play here in the Foyle Cup. Once
we get talking I soon find I get back into it.
</blockquote>

Tell us about the Sunderland side you played in. Who were the players
you admired and was anyone lucky to be allowed to wear our red and white
stripes?


<blockquote>I was very fortunate with the teams and players I played with. The
Sunderland team of 1962 that I joined were all good. Clough scored four (the record books say three -
ed!) and missed a penalty in my first game against Grimsby and I hit
the bar with my first kick. I didn’t play well for five or six weeks
though; I didn’t believe in those days that you needed time to settle in
but you do. Cloughie was sensational. In the end we became very
friendly and I have stayed friendly with his wife since he died.

Other memories: my hand going up with a golfball full of pus. I’d
pulled a hair that was under the skin. I still have the mark on my hand
from that. Also, going with len Shackleton to buy a house. I still
remember the name of the builder, Prentice, and what it cost me. Shack
told him “this is Johnny Crossan, he’s going to be a big star up here so
you’re not going to ask him for £4,750, you’re going to let him have it
for £4,500, aren’t you?” It was a cracking house I bought, up towards
Whitburn just past where the Bay Hotel was and not far from the Jolly
Sailor.

And I always used to go to Test matches with Brian Clough. But that
team: Monty, Cec Irwin, Len Ashurst, Stan Anderson, Charlie Hurley,
Jimmy McNab or Martin Harvey, Jimmy Davidson on the right wing, me or
George Herd at inside right, Brian Clough, me or George Herd at inside
left, then George Mulhall. I don’t think there was a bad player in that
team. George Mulhall was an excellent winger, Cloughie was a phenomenal
centre-forward and Charlie Hurley was the best centre-half ever seen.
Plus Monty and the rest. Everyone merited their place and Alan Brown,
though a sharp paratrooper kind of a man, seemed to get the best out of
the players. These guys just wanted to play. They were footballers and
nothing else mattered to them on Saturday afternoons. We had a reunion
about three years ago at the Stadium of Light, everyone except Jimmy
McNab who sadly had died, and it was a fantastic night.
</blockquote>
You played for us but also for Manchester City, Boro and nearly for Bristol City. Whose reuslts do you look for first?


<blockquote>Well Man City and Sunderland, but you don’t need to look
at one before the other with matches kicking off at all times. But hand
on heart if I had to put my last penny on it, it would have to be
Sunderland.

</blockquote>
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Post  Vincemac on 2013-02-12, 6:38 pm

George herd I remember him very well part of the promotion side
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