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Post  cyprussyd on 2018-12-17, 11:01 am

Now watched it all, the last episode is a real tear jerker but mixed with the,"I know what happens next".

Short doorstepped by a reporter in London and looking very uncomfortable. Bain driving away unsure of his future then Donald arriving at Newcastle airport and the Wolves game when that new future starts with a win.

It was that good I may well watch it again.

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Post  Black Cat Kiwi on 2019-01-13, 6:13 am

It's taken a couple of weeks as I'm not at the front of the queue in MY house  Embarassed

I thoroughly enjoyed it & like you Syd look forward to watching it again. Obviously for legal reasons a lot was left on the cutting room floor to be destroyed but a wonderful series to help explain the passion of the North East to those that just don't get it & follow more successful clubs.

Chris Coleman's text to the female chief pulled at my heart strings  I love you

BUT, my one parting wish though, is that I hope the man whom called Chris Coleman a F****n p***k has been outed & publicly named plus been given a lifetime ban from SoL.  I'm truly embarrassed by his actions No

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Post  oldblackcat on 2019-01-13, 7:04 am

Black Cat Kiwi wrote:It's taken a couple of weeks as I'm not at the front of the queue in MY house  Embarassed

I thoroughly enjoyed it & like you Syd look forward to watching it again. Obviously for legal reasons a lot was left on the cutting room floor to be destroyed but a wonderful series to help explain the passion of the North East to those that just don't get it & follow more successful clubs.

Chris Coleman's text to the female chief pulled at my heart strings  I love you

BUT, my one parting wish though, is that I hope the man whom called Chris Coleman a F****n p***k has been outed & publicly named plus been given a lifetime ban from SoL.  I'm truly embarrassed by his actions No

Yeah the big "hard" man trying to provoke a fight with Chris Coleman showed that although most fans let their passion show there's always an idiot...(maybe playing up for the camera?)
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Post  Kipper on 2019-01-25, 11:50 pm

I said I wouldn't watch it but I lied. I've just subscribed to Netflix and have wathed the first 2 episodes. I'm now depressed but know I'll have to watch it all.
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Post  gil t azell on 2019-01-26, 8:38 am

I havent watched it and I aint going to. I watched it live for 2 seasons and I aint going back.
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Post  cyprussyd on 2019-01-26, 8:42 am

I have watched it twice and enjoyed it, not depressed at all, I knew the ending.

I found it fascinating to see what was going on off the pitch and the taxi driver is a star.

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Post  Jerry the Jinx on 2019-01-26, 12:04 pm

gil t azell wrote:I havent watched it and I aint going to. I watched it live for 2 seasons and I aint going back.
My sentiments exactly
Only looking forwards
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Post  cyprussyd on 2019-01-26, 12:05 pm

Jerry the Jinx wrote:
gil t azell wrote:I havent watched it and I aint going to. I watched it live for 2 seasons and I aint going back.
My sentiments exactly
Only looking forwards
You would find it a fascinating watch, and quite funny, especially the taxi driver.

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Post  Black Cat Kiwi on 2019-01-30, 9:34 pm

Ex-skipper John O'Shea reveals '99% of players' were against Sunderland 'Til I Die Netflix documentary

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Former Sunderland skipper John O'Shea RICHARD MENNEAR Email Published: 09:22 Saturday 26 January 2019

Veteran defender O'Shea left the club in the summer, joining Reading on a free transfer, following Sunderland's relegation to League One. O'Shea suffered back-to-back relegations in his last two years at the club, the Netflix documentary capturing last season's dismal Championship campaign. The documentary was released globally before Christmas and has received widespread praise. But O'Shea has revealed pretty much the entire Sunderland squad did not want a film crew covering the campaign, which saw Simon Grayson and Chris Coleman in charge. "I have not watched all of it. I've lived through it so why would I need to watch it again?" said O'Shea told BBC Radio 5 Live. "From my point of view and I'd say 99% of the players, we didn't want it to happen. "It's one of those things. You go in in the morning, go in for a little bit of treatment and you realise there's little mini cameras dotted around."
O'Shea added: "The few bits I've seen, I'm glad the people of the club in the canteen, the player liaison officer, the kit men, they are really good people and I'm glad they have come out of it looking well. "The club itself is an amazing, amazing club and I loved every minute of it as it's a great place to play football. Yes the fans are passionate and vociferous but who doesn't want that? "I'm glad it's getting good reviews. The people behind it were good people. "You got to know the camera people but how things can be portrayed, with clever editing, for some of it I'd say it definitely came out unfair on some people.
"That's just how it was at the time as it was a negative story. It wasn't going to come out positive on everybody."

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Post  cyprussyd on 2019-02-07, 8:49 pm

f you watched Sunderland till I die on Netflix you will remember these two, great to see they survived the cull

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Post  Hieronymus on 2019-02-09, 10:03 am

Sunderland 'Til I Die - story behind Netflix documentary about a dysfunctional club
By Sean Cole
Football writer

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Sunderland's worst defeat of a dismal season was a 4-0 loss at Cardiff last January, during which Didier Ndong was sent off

The Netflix series Sunderland 'Til I Die had a bit of everything - a confrontation with a fan, a player who didn't want to play and a disastrous campaign that ended in relegation.

Released in December, it was the product of 10 months spent following Sunderland AFC during the 2017-18 season.
Newly relegated from the Premier League and hoping to make a swift return, the Black Cats instead went through two managers and a change of ownership on the way down to League One.

David Soutar, director and series producer, and Ben Turner, executive producer and Sunderland supporter, shared their thoughts on the process of making a documentary about a dysfunctional football club.

Did you experience much resistance from the players?
Former Sunderland captain John O'Shea, who joined Reading last summer, revealed in a recent interview with BBC Radio 5 Live that "99% of the squad" didn't want the documentary to happen.


Soutar: "That was definitely the group mentality. But the idea that 99% of them were against it doesn't really work because most of them would be doing stuff with us individually and talking to us about what was going on, although some players made it very clear that they didn't want to be part of it.
"But as John said in that interview, he understood the bigger picture and it was never a personal thing against the crew or the team. I think that some of them just worked out pretty quickly that they didn't want that year documented and they didn't want to be associated with it, because it's a tough enough thing for them to have on their footballing CV, let alone to have it attached to them on a wider platform."

Was there an awareness that some people might not come across well?
One of the standout moments of the programme is when midfielder Jack Rodwell tells a team-mate there is "no chance" he will play in an upcoming game. Chief executive Martin Bain featured heavily and left the club after relegation. And midfielder Darron Gibson has to turn around opinions after being filmed criticising team-mates before the season even begins.

Turner: "I think Martin [Bain] probably came across better than his image was. Most people thought he didn't really care. He cared very deeply but he was in an incredibly tough position.
"Someone like Jack Rodwell - we're always looking for the unexpected and I think people judge footballers too quickly. How many of them would walk away from that kind of money [reportedly £70,000 a week]?
"Most football clubs, while we love them as supporters, they're not desperately loyal to the players. They'll offload them if they're not performing. We would have been interested to explore someone like Jack Rodwell's story a lot deeper."

Soutar: "Absolutely. And we tried as well with him. I sort of compare how he comes across in the show to Darron Gibson. If you look at both of them, they both had tough seasons and fans completely dismissed them.
"But we tried to explain to Jack that if he tells us his side of the story and gives us a different perspective then we can show that. If he doesn't give us that then we can't. Whereas with Darron, when he gave that simple explanation and apology about his drunken slur at the beginning of the year, it showed a different side to him.
"It showed that he did care and he wasn't hiding away from these things that were happening. But with Jack we never got the opportunity to do that.
"We didn't go out of our way to intentionally make anyone look bad but we knew that fans were going to go for certain people because that's what they do."

Why do you think viewers responded to Jonny Williams in the way they did?
The Welsh midfielder, on loan from Crystal Palace, experienced a difficult season with injuries and living away from home. He is involved in emotional scenes when discussing his mental struggles with a sports psychologist.

Turner: "I think he was prepared to show a vulnerability that most people try to paper over. He's an example of what we were trying to communicate to some of the people who were less keen to be involved. There's a very dominant stereotype of what a footballer is but that tells a very small part of the story.
"I think because he was willing to open up and share what he was going through, then people sympathised with that. In a way people can relate to that more than a guy standing there with his arms aloft having just scored and feeling like he's on top of the world."

What was it like seeing people you worked with leave, like managers Simon Grayson and Chris Coleman?
Simon Grayson started the season in charge but was sacked in October. His replacement Chris Coleman was released before the final game of the season, with relegation confirmed.


Turner: "It's a strange thing because the story was amazing to follow but you're certainly not standing there hoping that it goes that way. And you definitely feel for them when it goes wrong. For as much as they're not comfortable being filmed, you'd rather not be documenting that."

What happened when the camera was smashed by a supporter?
At an away game against Bristol City in February, where Sunderland went 3-0 down in the first half, a couple of fans took exception to being filmed and confronted the cameraman.

Soutar: "That was when the frustration was really starting to bubble up. It was two individuals who didn't want to be filmed and that was the way that they deemed appropriate to communicate that to us, and to our cameraman. He tried to stand his ground and protect the camera, and instantly wanted to carry on and start filming again with our other camera.
"The majority of fans were absolutely brilliant with us. We built up such great relationships with some of them. It was just two individuals throughout a whole year of 50-odd games and at that moment tensions spilled over and they took their frustration out on us."

How is the second series shaping up?
Turner: "You're always at the mercy of following the story but what's particularly unique about the second series is the access we get to Stewart [Donald] and Charlie [Methven], the new owners, and how they're overhauling the club. They are interesting and special characters and it's been amazing. I think we're more embedded there than we could ever have imagined and it's utterly fascinating watching them work."


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Post  cyprussyd on 2019-02-09, 11:15 am

Hieronymus wrote:Sunderland 'Til I Die - story behind Netflix documentary about a dysfunctional club
By Sean Cole
Football writer

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Sunderland's worst defeat of a dismal season was a 4-0 loss at Cardiff last January, during which Didier Ndong was sent off

The Netflix series Sunderland 'Til I Die had a bit of everything - a confrontation with a fan, a player who didn't want to play and a disastrous campaign that ended in relegation.

Released in December, it was the product of 10 months spent following Sunderland AFC during the 2017-18 season.
Newly relegated from the Premier League and hoping to make a swift return, the Black Cats instead went through two managers and a change of ownership on the way down to League One.

David Soutar, director and series producer, and Ben Turner, executive producer and Sunderland supporter, shared their thoughts on the process of making a documentary about a dysfunctional football club.

Did you experience much resistance from the players?
Former Sunderland captain John O'Shea, who joined Reading last summer, revealed in a recent interview with BBC Radio 5 Live that "99% of the squad" didn't want the documentary to happen.


Soutar: "That was definitely the group mentality. But the idea that 99% of them were against it doesn't really work because most of them would be doing stuff with us individually and talking to us about what was going on, although some players made it very clear that they didn't want to be part of it.
"But as John said in that interview, he understood the bigger picture and it was never a personal thing against the crew or the team. I think that some of them just worked out pretty quickly that they didn't want that year documented and they didn't want to be associated with it, because it's a tough enough thing for them to have on their footballing CV, let alone to have it attached to them on a wider platform."

Was there an awareness that some people might not come across well?
One of the standout moments of the programme is when midfielder Jack Rodwell tells a team-mate there is "no chance" he will play in an upcoming game. Chief executive Martin Bain featured heavily and left the club after relegation. And midfielder Darron Gibson has to turn around opinions after being filmed criticising team-mates before the season even begins.

Turner: "I think Martin [Bain] probably came across better than his image was. Most people thought he didn't really care. He cared very deeply but he was in an incredibly tough position.
"Someone like Jack Rodwell - we're always looking for the unexpected and I think people judge footballers too quickly. How many of them would walk away from that kind of money [reportedly £70,000 a week]?
"Most football clubs, while we love them as supporters, they're not desperately loyal to the players. They'll offload them if they're not performing. We would have been interested to explore someone like Jack Rodwell's story a lot deeper."

Soutar: "Absolutely. And we tried as well with him. I sort of compare how he comes across in the show to Darron Gibson. If you look at both of them, they both had tough seasons and fans completely dismissed them.
"But we tried to explain to Jack that if he tells us his side of the story and gives us a different perspective then we can show that. If he doesn't give us that then we can't. Whereas with Darron, when he gave that simple explanation and apology about his drunken slur at the beginning of the year, it showed a different side to him.
"It showed that he did care and he wasn't hiding away from these things that were happening. But with Jack we never got the opportunity to do that.
"We didn't go out of our way to intentionally make anyone look bad but we knew that fans were going to go for certain people because that's what they do."

Why do you think viewers responded to Jonny Williams in the way they did?
The Welsh midfielder, on loan from Crystal Palace, experienced a difficult season with injuries and living away from home. He is involved in emotional scenes when discussing his mental struggles with a sports psychologist.

Turner: "I think he was prepared to show a vulnerability that most people try to paper over. He's an example of what we were trying to communicate to some of the people who were less keen to be involved. There's a very dominant stereotype of what a footballer is but that tells a very small part of the story.
"I think because he was willing to open up and share what he was going through, then people sympathised with that. In a way people can relate to that more than a guy standing there with his arms aloft having just scored and feeling like he's on top of the world."

What was it like seeing people you worked with leave, like managers Simon Grayson and Chris Coleman?
Simon Grayson started the season in charge but was sacked in October. His replacement Chris Coleman was released before the final game of the season, with relegation confirmed.


Turner: "It's a strange thing because the story was amazing to follow but you're certainly not standing there hoping that it goes that way. And you definitely feel for them when it goes wrong. For as much as they're not comfortable being filmed, you'd rather not be documenting that."

What happened when the camera was smashed by a supporter?
At an away game against Bristol City in February, where Sunderland went 3-0 down in the first half, a couple of fans took exception to being filmed and confronted the cameraman.

Soutar: "That was when the frustration was really starting to bubble up. It was two individuals who didn't want to be filmed and that was the way that they deemed appropriate to communicate that to us, and to our cameraman. He tried to stand his ground and protect the camera, and instantly wanted to carry on and start filming again with our other camera.
"The majority of fans were absolutely brilliant with us. We built up such great relationships with some of them. It was just two individuals throughout a whole year of 50-odd games and at that moment tensions spilled over and they took their frustration out on us."

How is the second series shaping up?
Turner: "You're always at the mercy of following the story but what's particularly unique about the second series is the access we get to Stewart [Donald] and Charlie [Methven], the new owners, and how they're overhauling the club. They are interesting and special characters and it's been amazing. I think we're more embedded there than we could ever have imagined and it's utterly fascinating watching them work."


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Very good and I have to say I really enjoyed the series and a few did come out better than I thought they would. Looking forward to the next series.

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Post  cyprussyd on 2019-02-09, 2:41 pm

Sunderland 'Til I Die producers lift lid on second series and reveal why it will make 'unique' and compulsive viewing 


RICHARD MENNEAR Email Published: 12:30 Saturday 09 February 2019 


Sunderland 'Til I Die proved a huge hit when it was released worldwide on Netflix, giving an insight into life on Wearside during last year's Championship relegation. 


Much has changed since those dark days at the Stadium of Light, with Ellis Short and the majority of the squad having moved on and the club's new owners, management team and squad have helped breathe new life into the club. 


Sunderland are now battling at the right end of the table this season, gunning for automatic promotion from League One at the first time of asking. The Netflix series, produced by Fulwell73, was released in December to widespread praise and the producers have been talking about the filming process, access and also giving an insight into what viewers can expect from series two, which is currently being filmed. 


Two of the key men at the centre of the story will be owner Stewart Donald and executive director Charlie Methven - and the second series promises to be compulsive viewing with unique behind-the-scenes access. 


David Soutar, director and series producer, and Ben Turner, executive producer and Sunderland AFC supporter, spoke to BBC Sport about the filming process. 


When asked how the second series is shaping up, Turner said: "You're always at the mercy of following the story but what's particularly unique about the second series is the access we get to Stewart [Donald] and Charlie [Methven], the new owners, and how they're overhauling the club. "They are interesting and special characters and it's been amazing. "I think we're more embedded there than we could ever have imagined and it's utterly fascinating watching them work." 


Former Sunderland skipper John O'Shea, who has since moved to Reading, had spoken openly about the filming process, revealing '99 per cent of the squad' didn't want the documentary to happen. Soutar added: "That was definitely the group mentality. But the idea that 99% of them were against it doesn't really work because most of them would be doing stuff with us individually and talking to us about what was going on, although some players made it very clear that they didn't want to be part of it. "But as John said in that interview, he understood the bigger picture and it was never a personal thing against the crew or the team. "I think that some of them just worked out pretty quickly that they didn't want that year documented and they didn't want to be associated with it, because it's a tough enough thing for them to have on their footballing CV, let alone to have it attached to them on a wider platform.

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Post  Kipper on 2019-02-12, 10:53 am

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Written by: James Forrest
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Well, last night after I chucked it for the evening I was going through Netflix looking for something a bit different to watch. What I found was something a bit special instead; their incredible fly-on-the-wall documentary Sunderland ‘Til I Die.
Every footballer supporter should see this. I am not joking.
It is riveting.
Eight episodes, each around 45 minutes long, just flew by.
It is astonishing that a documentary team got this much access to a club which was going through a dark, dark spell.

It is amazing that they captured so much raw emotion, so much truth. I was transfixed by it, honestly.
It is a superb – and harrowing – chronicle of a team in freefall, melting down before your eyes, a team which, it swiftly becomes apparent, had ceased to be one long before the cameras rolled.
Two years ago, I went on holiday having bought the entire catalogue of Secret Footballer books for chilling out around the pool.

They are exceptional reads.
In one of them, the writer talks about the Adam Johnson situation. He said something that stayed with me and which I kept thinking about as the remarkable story of the 2017-18 season at the Stadium of Light was unfolding like a slow motion disaster.
He said that when the story broke about the at first un-named Premiership footballer he’d have put money on him being a Sunderland player. He said that the only surprise was the identity of the man himself. He said there were a half dozen others at the club whose names would have come to mind before Adam Johnson.
I am sure he didn’t mean that a lot of their players are engaged in that kind of activity; what he meant is that the club is notorious in the sport for the indiscipline inside it, for the attitudes of a squad which has nothing in common with the fans who you see go through a rollercoaster of emotion in support of their team.
In a well-known article for his own site, The Secret Footballer said of the club that “something seems to happen to people who go there.”

What he described as a “drinking culture” that was unprecedented in the league seemed to match much of what was happening on the screen, but more than that it offers an explanation for what you don’t see but can sense in a number of scenes … a club riven by some deep seated malaise, and whose players appear to be pulling in opposite directions from the very first day of the league campaign.
Even before that there is a stunning moment which sets the tone for all that comes later.
The first episode opens with us going there for their last pre-season game.
There is optimism amongst the fans.
What they see of course is Rodgers’ swaggering Invincibles destroying them 5-0.
In the aftermath of the match, the club’s midfielder Darron Gibson heads out on the piss, encounters some of his club’s fans in a boozer and seriously the worse for wear offers his “opinions” on his team-mates. Let’s just say he isn’t exuding confidence for what lies ahead.
It is an astonishingly negative opening to the season for everyone at the club, and in particular for the new manager Simon Grayson. It is a headache he certainly doesn’t need.
Gibson is involved in another incident towards the end of the season, another unsavoury moment at the centre of which is booze.
You could not make this stuff up, it is too close to the bone.
The club’s director of football is a man who will be familiar to all Scottish football fans; it’s Martin Bain, formerly of Rangers, and he cuts a forlorn figure almost all of the time. He and those who work under him are simply overmatched by the scale of the disaster they are in charge of managing; you see Bain work tirelessly to get signings done, his frustration as opportunities slip through his fingers and you watch him agonise over Grayson’s future as the slide becomes a drop.
At no point does he seem like a man in control; he exudes confidence at certain points, but it’s not even a very convincing façade because the next reversal is never far away. The next disaster is already on the other side of the wheel, coming round.
I don’t know whether Bain is just dreadful at his job – his time at Ibrox was hilariously bad and suggests that he is – or whether the club was just an untamed shambles that nobody could have fixed, but it makes me not want to complain overmuch about Peter Lawwell for a while.
There are moments which are genuinely painful to watch, like a young footballer who has given the club everything over the campaign breaking down talking to the camera, and Chris Coleman, who exudes calm all the way through his own abysmal time as boss, snapping with a fan in what’s nearly a very ugly scene after the club’s fate is sealed.
But it’s the little moments of dissent and disharmony that will haunt me and they are the reason I would be appalled if Celtic ever decided to do something like this. You might think you want to know what goes on behind the scenes at your own club, but believe me there are moments that are better off forever remaining private and which should never see the light of day.
Take the scenes involving players talking to the camera, on the record, about their team-mates and their manager; they are deeply disturbing and would be devastating to everyone concerned if all the parties were still at the club when the show finally aired.
There is a scene involving a player who’s on the way out the door and who can hardly wait to leave; his lack of professionalism and total unconcern as he abandons ship is openly expressed. There’s also a scene involving players sniggering over a potential new arrival; I’m not joking.
Senior pros actually slagging a senior pro at another club who at that point seems to be on his way to theirs.
The way it lays bare relationships between people inside the walls is deeply unsettling. An early scene involving Bain and the club’s head of youth development as they plan the club’s transfer strategy – which is only then imparted to the manager – is the sort that would have had fans burning season tickets on the spot had they known what was going on behind the scenes. Imagine a similar scene involving Lawwell and Lee Congerton; it chills the blood.
Especially when you consider that Congerton was Sunderland’s director of football.
Celtic is a club that is sometimes accused of playing its cards close to its chest.
You know what?
Watching this I am partly glad that they do.
Believe me, there are things we don’t want to know, such as which players are suffering through confidence crises so bad they are talking to the club shrink about how demotivated, even terrified, they feel. Listening to seasoned pros talking about their manager with casual disdain is a shock to the system.
(The identity of the player who is most vocal on that score will come as a surprise to some but not to others; it shines a light on a very well-known falling out within Celtic.)
Imagine watching a behind-the-scenes look at the Mowbray season; who, really, would want that much information? Who would want senior footballers to go on the camera and mouth off about him in a way that made you recoil when you saw them, later, still in the team? Imagine a documentary on the events of our summer just past; I mean, really. One of the only saving graces from that spell was that most of it was kept out of the public gaze.
There’s one footballer in the documentary who is mentioned a few times but never appears on the screen; he was the highest paid at the club but was so ineffective he wasn’t even playing most weeks. They were desperate to get him off the books, but he remained to hive off big money.
We know there have been players who’ve stayed at our club on high salaries who we’d have loved to move on and never did; if you think you’re peeved now imagine seeing scenes where the club desperately tries to free up a few quid for the transfer window by offering him moves elsewhere only for him to steadfastly turn them all down and consequences to the club be damned.
Since taking over as the manager at Celtic, Brendan has largely stamped out the dressing room leakers.
That’s why Kris Boyd’s idiotic comments about splits was so easy to dismiss.
Nobody talks out of class at Celtic; the persistent rumour that Mulumba was dropped because he foolishly spoke to the media when he shouldn’t remains just speculation but it makes a lot of sense. Whoever let that story into the public domain was careful not to get caught lest they suffer the same consequences; it’s not even out of the question that the leak was strategic, to serve as a warning to others to watch their mouths when speaking with the press.
I know a lot of Celtic fans thirst for information about the club, all day, every day. So do I. Most of the time.
But during our summer of fun I didn’t want answers as much as for someone to reassure me that everything was going to be alright. We still don’t know what the final, full, effects of those events were; most days I try to put that out of my mind.
But I know this; say a documentary came out halfway through next season which laid bare everything that had gone on behind the scenes. It would be like detonating a bomb at the heart of the club, and then there might be no recovering from it for years.
It is impossible to watch Sunderland ‘Til I Die and not imagine your own club captured so nakedly, all artifice stripped away, laid bare from boot-room to boardroom. It took enormous courage for those running the club to agree to it; it was either courage or Bain really is an insatiable self-publicist who couldn’t wait to be on camera.
Did the documentary makers sense, when they were pitching it, that things were so bad behind the scenes that they were going to be filming an extraordinary denouement to a crazy era at the club? Put simply, did they suspect that what they were going to capture would be train-wreck TV? Was that what motivated them, or did they genuinely think they were going to film the phoenix-like rise of a newly relegated club as it shook itself off and rebuilt?
Whatever they thought, I think they realised quickly the nature of what they were capturing on camera; what is most extraordinary is that those in charge there did not restrict their access, and did not terminate the project as swiftly as they terminated the manager. I don’t know whether the Sunderland fans are grateful for that or horror-struck.
I just know I wouldn’t like it to be me. I wouldn’t like it to be us.
Sunderland fans can take heart from the ending; it does suggest that better times are ahead.
There is talk of “cleansing” the whole place, and that word appears fitting.
Celtic is in a very stable place right now, in spite of the summer of fun; how long we’d stay that way if we knew more than we do … that’s the question that I really don’t think I want the answer to.
What a wonderful documentary series that was.
It was thrilling, and every fan of every club should watch it.
Please, Celtic, please … never, ever agree to do anything remotely like it.
Kipper
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Post  Guest on 2019-02-12, 11:31 am

Still not watched the whole thing yet... the question is washing your dirty linen in public does it help to put it all behind you?

Are there still individuals at the club, who need to be moved on?
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