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I think i have flu

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I think i have flu

Post  vinkel on 2018-01-10, 9:22 am

Never imagined i could feel as weak as this, never slept last night , watched the clock round hour by hour. This is bloody awful.

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vinkel
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  cyprussyd on 2018-01-10, 9:25 am

vinkel wrote:Never imagined i could feel as weak as this, never slept last night , watched the clock round hour by hour. This is bloody awful.
I hope its not the new virus that I had. Dec 24th it hit me and I am still on antibiotics to kill it off.

Get to the doctors

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  sunderpitt on 2018-01-10, 10:08 am

I usually catch everything going... and it is certainly doing the rounds.. loads of people have it... some had to be hospitalized 

Get medical advice..

Apparently  the flu jab I had last year does not cover this strain
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  Hieronymus on 2018-01-10, 10:40 am

This dreadul flu has laid many low. Touch wood so far I have escaped it although had a nasty cold or something just before the kids arrived that made me feel quite ill for a few days, and gave me a trerrible cough that I could not shift for ages.

If you have pains in your chest and are finding it hard to breathe you might have developed a chest infection/pneumonia which will need antibiotics to fight. If you feel so ill you can hardly get out of bed ring your doctor and ask for a home visit. There is no point in going to the GP surgery and spreading it further.

A bout of 'flu can leave you very weak and feeling quite ill for many weeks so don't try and do too much as you recover.

Oh and take plenty of fluids - I don't think beer/wine/whisky count!

Take care Vinkel and Syd and anyone else suffering kiss
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  cyprussyd on 2018-01-10, 11:44 am

Hieronymus wrote:This dreadul flu has laid many low. Touch wood so far I have escaped it although had a nasty cold or something just before the kids arrived that made me feel quite ill for a few days, and gave me a trerrible cough that I could not shift for ages.

If you have pains in your chest and are finding it hard to breathe you might have developed a chest infection/pneumonia which will need antibiotics to fight. If you feel so ill you can hardly get out of bed ring your doctor and ask for a home visit. There is no point in going to the GP surgery and spreading it further.

A bout of 'flu can leave you very weak and feeling quite ill for many weeks so don't try and do too much as you recover.

Oh and take plenty of fluids - I don't think beer/wine/whisky count!

Take care Vinkel and Syd and anyone else suffering kiss
5 weeks since the outset I still have breathing problems and getting back to full strength is proving a long road.

Good luck with getting the doctor out, they are simply refusing down here and have full surgeries none stop.

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  Gordon Armstrong on 2018-01-10, 12:47 pm

vinkel wrote:Never imagined i could feel as weak as this, never slept last night , watched the clock round hour by hour. This is bloody awful.

Just get on with it, you bliddy softy . . . . be a man about it, like a woman would be batty
See a doctor, though Wink
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  Hieronymus on 2018-01-10, 1:03 pm

cyprussyd wrote:
Hieronymus wrote:This dreadul flu has laid many low. Touch wood so far I have escaped it although had a nasty cold or something just before the kids arrived that made me feel quite ill for a few days, and gave me a trerrible cough that I could not shift for ages.

If you have pains in your chest and are finding it hard to breathe you might have developed a chest infection/pneumonia which will need antibiotics to fight. If you feel so ill you can hardly get out of bed ring your doctor and ask for a home visit. There is no point in going to the GP surgery and spreading it further.

A bout of 'flu can leave you very weak and feeling quite ill for many weeks so don't try and do too much as you recover.

Oh and take plenty of fluids - I don't think beer/wine/whisky count!

Take care Vinkel and Syd and anyone else suffering kiss
5 weeks since the outset I still have breathing problems and getting back to full strength is proving a long road.

Good luck with getting the doctor out, they are simply refusing down here and have full surgeries none stop.
One of the benefits of living in a remote/rural area is we still have GP home visits especially for the housebound and disabled, and for new mums, which I think is vital with the numbers of patients living so far from GP surgeries. We can also get an appointment the next day and often the same day if we are willing to go to the surgery. Small things but so important. Everyone should have the same level of service.

Get well soon everyone Smile
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  cyprussyd on 2018-01-10, 1:24 pm

Gordon Armstrong wrote:
vinkel wrote:Never imagined i could feel as weak as this, never slept last night , watched the clock round hour by hour. This is bloody awful.

Just get on with it, you bliddy softy . . . . be a man about it, like a woman would be batty
See a doctor, though Wink
That's an excellent likeness of Vinkle

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  sunderpitt on 2018-01-10, 2:03 pm

[size=43]What is 'Aussie' flu and should we be worried?[/size]
         8 January 2018
           


The NHS is preparing itself for a bad flu season.
One of the strains circulating this year - H3N2 - has been dubbed Aussie flu because it is the same strain that recently caused big problems for Australia.
Australia's 2017 flu season was the worst the country had experienced in nearly a decade.
Experts are waiting to see if similar will happen in the UK, after a recent rise in cases.
[size=32]What is Aussie flu?[/size]
Every winter there are a few strains circulating and Aussie flu or H3N2 is just one of them. It is an influenza A virus that appears to cause more severe infections in young children and the elderly.
Most people will recover in about a week and won't need any specific treatment, apart from a bit of bed rest, some paracetamol or ibuprofen and drinking plenty of fluids.
But for some - the very old, very young or people with pre-existing health conditions such as heart disease - flu can be deadly.
[size=32]Is Aussie flu worse than other types of flu?[/size]
The UK is seeing a mix of flu types circulating including influenza B as well as the H3N2 strain.
H3N2 is not new. It was around last winter too.
Any strain of flu, including H3N2, can be dangerous for people who are vulnerable to it.
Experience from last winter suggests the elderly are a high risk group for H3N2.
Influenza viruses are given different names based on their type - A, B and C. A is usually the most serious while C is usually a milder infection. They can be further subdivided according to the proteins that they carry on their surface. These are called H and N antigens.
[size=32]How bad is the situation in the UK?[/size]
Hospital admissions and GP visits for influenza have seen a sharp rise going into 2018, but are still comparable to the previous winter and are nowhere near as high as in 2008-09 when the swine flu pandemic hit the UK.
Professor Paul Cosford, Medical Director, Public Health England said: "As we would expect at this time of year, flu levels have increased this week. Our data shows that more people are visiting GPs with flu symptoms and we are seeing more people admitted to hospitals with the flu. The vaccine is the best defence we have against the spread of flu and it isn't too late to get vaccinated."
[size=32]What about the flu jab?[/size]
The vaccine is designed to protect against the type of flu circulating in any given season.
Every year, the World Health Organization reviews the global situation and recommends which flu strains should go into the vaccine to be manufactured for the following season.
This year's flu jab is designed to protect against H3N2 as well as some other strains.
[size=32]How effective is it?[/size]
Vaccination is the best protection we have against flu.
But flu is unpredictable. Flu viruses constantly mutate and change, so it is a moving target to fight.
Public Health England says typical effectiveness of the flu vaccine is 40-60%, which means that for every 100 people vaccinated, between 40 and 60 will be protected.
At risk people are advised to have annual flu jabs because flu strains can change from year to year, plus protection from the flu vaccine may wane after about six months.
Adults aged over 65, pregnant women and those with underlying health conditions are advised to get a free flu jab.
A flu nasal spray is available free to young children, who are thought to be the main spreaders of flu.
[size=32]Why doesn't it stop all strains?[/size]
In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A/H1N1 viruses than H3N2, according to US experts at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.
And it's already known that flu vaccines may work less well in elderly people because they have weaker immune systems.
Dr Richard Pebody, from Public Health England, said: "This season's flu vaccine should be providing reasonable protection, similar to last winter. Last year the vaccine did not give quite as good protection for the elderly for H3N2.
"That's something that we are watching closely to see if it is an issue this winter."
How the vaccines are made might also determine their effectiveness, according to research.
Flu vaccines used in the UK and in many other parts of the world are currently grown in chicken eggs and this process can be tricky.
Recent research in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found the H3N2 part of the flu vaccine did not grow simply during this process and developed mutations.
When they tested the vaccine in animals and humans they found the H3N2 part did a partial job of protecting against this strain of flu.
The vaccine had 20-30% effectiveness against H3N2.
Experts stress this is still our best defence against the virus.
And the jab provides excellent protection against other flu strains.
A spokesman from Public Health England said: "Although we would like this to be higher, this is still a very valuable level of protection against what can be a nasty and sometimes deadly illness."
[size=32]Should I have a flu jab?[/size]
Experts recommend that all those who are eligible for a free flu jab on the NHS should take up the offer.
If you want to protect yourself against flu and you're not in one of the groups, you can buy the flu jab from high street pharmacies.
People who can get it for free from the NHS include:
         over 65s
         pregnant women
         Adults and children with an underlying health condition, such as asthma, or a weakened immune system which puts them at risk of serious complications from flu
A flu nasal spray is available to two and three-year-olds and some children at primary school.
Front-line health and social care workers are also eligible to receive the flu vaccine.
[size=32]Is it flu?[/size]
Flu symptoms come on very quickly and can include:
         fever (temperature above 38C)
         aches
         tiredness or exhaustion
         dry, chesty cough
         sore throat
         headache
         loss of appetite
         tummy pain or diarrhoea
         nausea and being sick
[size=32]Should I go to hospital?[/size]
If you develop sudden chest pain, have difficulty breathing or start coughing up blood, call 999 or go to A&E.
See your GP if:
         your symptoms don't improve after seven days
         you're worried about your child's symptoms
         you're 65 or over
         you're pregnant
         you have a long-term medical condition such as diabetes, or heart or lung disease
         you have a weakened immune system (for example, you take HIV therapy or are on chemotherapy)
[size=32]Help stop the spread[/size]
Flu is very infectious and easily spread to other people. You're more likely to give it to others in the first five days.
Flu is spread by germs from coughs and sneezes, which can live on hands and surfaces for 24 hours.
To reduce the risk of spreading flu:
         wash your hands often with warm water and soap
         use tissues to trap germs when you cough or sneeze
   
                  bin used tissues as quickly as possible
avatar
sunderpitt
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Posts : 7283
Join date : 2012-08-25

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  cyprussyd on 2018-01-10, 2:06 pm

sunderpitt wrote:[size=43]What is 'Aussie' flu and should we be worried?[/size]
         8 January 2018
           


The NHS is preparing itself for a bad flu season.
One of the strains circulating this year - H3N2 - has been dubbed Aussie flu because it is the same strain that recently caused big problems for Australia.
Australia's 2017 flu season was the worst the country had experienced in nearly a decade.
Experts are waiting to see if similar will happen in the UK, after a recent rise in cases.
[size=32]What is Aussie flu?[/size]
Every winter there are a few strains circulating and Aussie flu or H3N2 is just one of them. It is an influenza A virus that appears to cause more severe infections in young children and the elderly.
Most people will recover in about a week and won't need any specific treatment, apart from a bit of bed rest, some paracetamol or ibuprofen and drinking plenty of fluids.
But for some - the very old, very young or people with pre-existing health conditions such as heart disease - flu can be deadly.
[size=32]Is Aussie flu worse than other types of flu?[/size]
The UK is seeing a mix of flu types circulating including influenza B as well as the H3N2 strain.
H3N2 is not new. It was around last winter too.
Any strain of flu, including H3N2, can be dangerous for people who are vulnerable to it.
Experience from last winter suggests the elderly are a high risk group for H3N2.
Influenza viruses are given different names based on their type - A, B and C. A is usually the most serious while C is usually a milder infection. They can be further subdivided according to the proteins that they carry on their surface. These are called H and N antigens.
[size=32]How bad is the situation in the UK?[/size]
Hospital admissions and GP visits for influenza have seen a sharp rise going into 2018, but are still comparable to the previous winter and are nowhere near as high as in 2008-09 when the swine flu pandemic hit the UK.
Professor Paul Cosford, Medical Director, Public Health England said: "As we would expect at this time of year, flu levels have increased this week. Our data shows that more people are visiting GPs with flu symptoms and we are seeing more people admitted to hospitals with the flu. The vaccine is the best defence we have against the spread of flu and it isn't too late to get vaccinated."
[size=32]What about the flu jab?[/size]
The vaccine is designed to protect against the type of flu circulating in any given season.
Every year, the World Health Organization reviews the global situation and recommends which flu strains should go into the vaccine to be manufactured for the following season.
This year's flu jab is designed to protect against H3N2 as well as some other strains.
[size=32]How effective is it?[/size]
Vaccination is the best protection we have against flu.
But flu is unpredictable. Flu viruses constantly mutate and change, so it is a moving target to fight.
Public Health England says typical effectiveness of the flu vaccine is 40-60%, which means that for every 100 people vaccinated, between 40 and 60 will be protected.
At risk people are advised to have annual flu jabs because flu strains can change from year to year, plus protection from the flu vaccine may wane after about six months.
Adults aged over 65, pregnant women and those with underlying health conditions are advised to get a free flu jab.
A flu nasal spray is available free to young children, who are thought to be the main spreaders of flu.
[size=32]Why doesn't it stop all strains?[/size]
In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A/H1N1 viruses than H3N2, according to US experts at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.
And it's already known that flu vaccines may work less well in elderly people because they have weaker immune systems.
Dr Richard Pebody, from Public Health England, said: "This season's flu vaccine should be providing reasonable protection, similar to last winter. Last year the vaccine did not give quite as good protection for the elderly for H3N2.
"That's something that we are watching closely to see if it is an issue this winter."
How the vaccines are made might also determine their effectiveness, according to research.
Flu vaccines used in the UK and in many other parts of the world are currently grown in chicken eggs and this process can be tricky.
Recent research in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found the H3N2 part of the flu vaccine did not grow simply during this process and developed mutations.
When they tested the vaccine in animals and humans they found the H3N2 part did a partial job of protecting against this strain of flu.
The vaccine had 20-30% effectiveness against H3N2.
Experts stress this is still our best defence against the virus.
And the jab provides excellent protection against other flu strains.
A spokesman from Public Health England said: "Although we would like this to be higher, this is still a very valuable level of protection against what can be a nasty and sometimes deadly illness."
[size=32]Should I have a flu jab?[/size]
Experts recommend that all those who are eligible for a free flu jab on the NHS should take up the offer.
If you want to protect yourself against flu and you're not in one of the groups, you can buy the flu jab from high street pharmacies.
People who can get it for free from the NHS include:
         over 65s
         pregnant women
         Adults and children with an underlying health condition, such as asthma, or a weakened immune system which puts them at risk of serious complications from flu
A flu nasal spray is available to two and three-year-olds and some children at primary school.
Front-line health and social care workers are also eligible to receive the flu vaccine.
[size=32]Is it flu?[/size]
Flu symptoms come on very quickly and can include:
         fever (temperature above 38C)
         aches
         tiredness or exhaustion
         dry, chesty cough
         sore throat
         headache
         loss of appetite
         tummy pain or diarrhoea
         nausea and being sick
[size=32]Should I go to hospital?[/size]
If you develop sudden chest pain, have difficulty breathing or start coughing up blood, call 999 or go to A&E.
See your GP if:
         your symptoms don't improve after seven days
         you're worried about your child's symptoms
         you're 65 or over
         you're pregnant
         you have a long-term medical condition such as diabetes, or heart or lung disease
         you have a weakened immune system (for example, you take HIV therapy or are on chemotherapy)
[size=32]Help stop the spread[/size]
Flu is very infectious and easily spread to other people. You're more likely to give it to others in the first five days.
Flu is spread by germs from coughs and sneezes, which can live on hands and surfaces for 24 hours.
To reduce the risk of spreading flu:
         wash your hands often with warm water and soap
         use tissues to trap germs when you cough or sneeze
   
                  bin used tissues as quickly as possible
It's What I had and am still fighting, it has left me very weak

________________________________________________________
          My glass is always half full and occasionally over flowing. [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
avatar
cyprussyd
Senior Member(Top Cat)
Senior Member(Top Cat)

Posts : 47154
Join date : 2012-07-31
Age : 70
Location : Durham

http://www.sunderlandmad.com

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  vinkel on 2018-01-10, 3:52 pm

cyprussyd wrote:
sunderpitt wrote:[size=43]What is 'Aussie' flu and should we be worried?[/size]
         8 January 2018
           


The NHS is preparing itself for a bad flu season.
One of the strains circulating this year - H3N2 - has been dubbed Aussie flu because it is the same strain that recently caused big problems for Australia.
Australia's 2017 flu season was the worst the country had experienced in nearly a decade.
Experts are waiting to see if similar will happen in the UK, after a recent rise in cases.
[size=32]What is Aussie flu?[/size]
Every winter there are a few strains circulating and Aussie flu or H3N2 is just one of them. It is an influenza A virus that appears to cause more severe infections in young children and the elderly.
Most people will recover in about a week and won't need any specific treatment, apart from a bit of bed rest, some paracetamol or ibuprofen and drinking plenty of fluids.
But for some - the very old, very young or people with pre-existing health conditions such as heart disease - flu can be deadly.
[size=32]Is Aussie flu worse than other types of flu?[/size]
The UK is seeing a mix of flu types circulating including influenza B as well as the H3N2 strain.
H3N2 is not new. It was around last winter too.
Any strain of flu, including H3N2, can be dangerous for people who are vulnerable to it.
Experience from last winter suggests the elderly are a high risk group for H3N2.
Influenza viruses are given different names based on their type - A, B and C. A is usually the most serious while C is usually a milder infection. They can be further subdivided according to the proteins that they carry on their surface. These are called H and N antigens.
[size=32]How bad is the situation in the UK?[/size]
Hospital admissions and GP visits for influenza have seen a sharp rise going into 2018, but are still comparable to the previous winter and are nowhere near as high as in 2008-09 when the swine flu pandemic hit the UK.
Professor Paul Cosford, Medical Director, Public Health England said: "As we would expect at this time of year, flu levels have increased this week. Our data shows that more people are visiting GPs with flu symptoms and we are seeing more people admitted to hospitals with the flu. The vaccine is the best defence we have against the spread of flu and it isn't too late to get vaccinated."
[size=32]What about the flu jab?[/size]
The vaccine is designed to protect against the type of flu circulating in any given season.
Every year, the World Health Organization reviews the global situation and recommends which flu strains should go into the vaccine to be manufactured for the following season.
This year's flu jab is designed to protect against H3N2 as well as some other strains.
[size=32]How effective is it?[/size]
Vaccination is the best protection we have against flu.
But flu is unpredictable. Flu viruses constantly mutate and change, so it is a moving target to fight.
Public Health England says typical effectiveness of the flu vaccine is 40-60%, which means that for every 100 people vaccinated, between 40 and 60 will be protected.
At risk people are advised to have annual flu jabs because flu strains can change from year to year, plus protection from the flu vaccine may wane after about six months.
Adults aged over 65, pregnant women and those with underlying health conditions are advised to get a free flu jab.
A flu nasal spray is available free to young children, who are thought to be the main spreaders of flu.
[size=32]Why doesn't it stop all strains?[/size]
In general, current flu vaccines tend to work better against influenza B and influenza A/H1N1 viruses than H3N2, according to US experts at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.
And it's already known that flu vaccines may work less well in elderly people because they have weaker immune systems.
Dr Richard Pebody, from Public Health England, said: "This season's flu vaccine should be providing reasonable protection, similar to last winter. Last year the vaccine did not give quite as good protection for the elderly for H3N2.
"That's something that we are watching closely to see if it is an issue this winter."
How the vaccines are made might also determine their effectiveness, according to research.
Flu vaccines used in the UK and in many other parts of the world are currently grown in chicken eggs and this process can be tricky.
Recent research in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found the H3N2 part of the flu vaccine did not grow simply during this process and developed mutations.
When they tested the vaccine in animals and humans they found the H3N2 part did a partial job of protecting against this strain of flu.
The vaccine had 20-30% effectiveness against H3N2.
Experts stress this is still our best defence against the virus.
And the jab provides excellent protection against other flu strains.
A spokesman from Public Health England said: "Although we would like this to be higher, this is still a very valuable level of protection against what can be a nasty and sometimes deadly illness."
[size=32]Should I have a flu jab?[/size]
Experts recommend that all those who are eligible for a free flu jab on the NHS should take up the offer.
If you want to protect yourself against flu and you're not in one of the groups, you can buy the flu jab from high street pharmacies.
People who can get it for free from the NHS include:
         over 65s
         pregnant women
         Adults and children with an underlying health condition, such as asthma, or a weakened immune system which puts them at risk of serious complications from flu
A flu nasal spray is available to two and three-year-olds and some children at primary school.
Front-line health and social care workers are also eligible to receive the flu vaccine.
[size=32]Is it flu?[/size]
Flu symptoms come on very quickly and can include:
         fever (temperature above 38C)
         aches
         tiredness or exhaustion
         dry, chesty cough
         sore throat
         headache
         loss of appetite
         tummy pain or diarrhoea
         nausea and being sick
[size=32]Should I go to hospital?[/size]
If you develop sudden chest pain, have difficulty breathing or start coughing up blood, call 999 or go to A&E.
See your GP if:
         your symptoms don't improve after seven days
         you're worried about your child's symptoms
         you're 65 or over
         you're pregnant
         you have a long-term medical condition such as diabetes, or heart or lung disease
         you have a weakened immune system (for example, you take HIV therapy or are on chemotherapy)
[size=32]Help stop the spread[/size]
Flu is very infectious and easily spread to other people. You're more likely to give it to others in the first five days.
Flu is spread by germs from coughs and sneezes, which can live on hands and surfaces for 24 hours.
To reduce the risk of spreading flu:
         wash your hands often with warm water and soap
         use tissues to trap germs when you cough or sneeze
   
                  bin used tissues as quickly as possible
It's What I had and am still fighting, it has left me very weak
I feel big men suffer badly from colds and flu, as they need their strength to carry their bulk.

________________________________________________________
Today i am as young as i ever will be.
avatar
vinkel
National News Correspondent.
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Posts : 2497
Join date : 2015-02-02
Age : 67
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  Billy D on 2018-01-11, 2:29 pm

No chance of getting a doctor out where I live.
Unless someone has died. Then they have to.
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Billy D
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  vinkel on 2018-01-14, 12:43 pm

It has been a week now and i feel i am getting over the flu symptoms, shivers shaking aches and pains etc. Now i have a chest cough woke this morning with stomach pains from coughing. I now can see how this condition kills off the elderly.

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  oldblackcat on 2018-01-14, 2:17 pm

Glad you're feeling a bit better Vinkel....it's been over two weeks now that I've had the flu but I think I'm on the road to recovery....
I think there's a few different strains going round and I think I've had a mild one...unlike my step-daughter who ended up in hospital,thankfully she's home now and on the road to recovery thank's to our fantastic NHS staff!
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  sunderpitt on 2018-01-14, 2:48 pm

oldblackcat wrote:Glad you're feeling a bit better Vinkel....it's been over two weeks now that I've had the flu but I think I'm on the road to recovery....
I think there's a few different strains going round and I think I've had a mild one...unlike my step-daughter who ended up in hospital,thankfully she's home now and on the road to recovery thank's to our fantastic NHS staff!

Atm I have a heavy cold  (I refuse to say I have the flu) and i know a few folk who have had to go to hospital. The bad thing about the cold is that i did not play golf yesterday and therefore was able to watch the game. Starting with yet another goal keeper error for there first goal. Tough sending of of N'Dong
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  Hieronymus on 2018-01-14, 3:19 pm

vinkel wrote:It has been a week now and i feel i am getting over the flu symptoms, shivers shaking aches and pains etc. Now i have a chest cough woke this morning with stomach pains from coughing. I now can see how this condition kills off the elderly.
Take it easy and don't try and do too much. It is very nasty. Hope you feel better very soon Smile
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Re: I think i have flu

Post  vinkel on 2018-01-18, 10:20 am

After 11days trying self treatment  ( i think i have gotten over the original flu ) i have had to seek medical help. Just got 10 day supply of antibiotics for the chest. Hey ho.

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Re: I think i have flu

Post  Hieronymus on 2018-01-18, 3:06 pm

vinkel wrote:After 11days trying self treatment  ( i think i have gotten over the original flu ) i have had to seek medical help. Just got 10 day supply of antibiotics for the chest. Hey ho.
I refer you to my post #4 on this thread.  Men!! Evil or Very Mad


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